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    12 South Carolina Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments 1 comment
    Jan
    15

    South Carolina writingAs 2015 opens, our State Writing Resources series rolls on. And speaking of rolling–like, cigarettes and stuff–up next is South Carolina, the Palmetto State. Which, as I see now, is only sixth in the U.S. in tobacco production. North Carolina is first, and we’ve already covered it. I got my Carolinae confused! But it’s far, far too late to rewrite this lame intro now.

    South Carolina writing can brag of some heavy-hitting authors, including Dorothy Allison, Pat Conroy (The Prince of Tides), William Gibson, Valerie Sayers, and Norb Vonnegut (a fourth cousin of that other Vonnegut). Many of you are likely also familiar with the name Matthew J. Bruccoli, which, because he wrote an intro, is now on that omnipresent Great Gatsby cover.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 12 South Carolina writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a Palmetto Stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    10 Rhode Island Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Dec
    18
    The author in Rhode Island, a file which is named "Idiot in Providence."

    The author in Rhode Island, a file which is named “Idiot in Providence.”

    A simple “Hope” is the motto for Rhode Island, up next in our State Writing Resources series. One of the original thirteen colonies, Rhode Island is the smallest in area–in fact, its other nickname is “Little Rhody”–but it’s a tough little bugger. For example, did you know that Rhode Island was the first colony to declare independence from Great Britain? May 4, 1776. It’s also not an island, so don’t blame it if it’s sometimes confused.

    Rhode Island writing has a history–and a present–as strong as the state’s own. Jhumpa Lahiri grew up in Kingston, where her father worked as a librarian at URI. Ted Berrigan and H.P. Lovecraft were born in Providence. Forrest Gander, whose new novel The Trace I enjoyed, teaches at Brown. So does the great John Edgar Wideman, whose stellar short story “What We Cannot Speak About We Must Pass Over in Silence” we used to teach in workshops. Robert Coover is a professor emeritus at Brown. It’s quite a lineup there; may I please go back in time and study writing at Brown?

    Presented in no particular order, here are 10 Rhode Island writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are an ocean stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    12 Pennsylvania Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Dec
    4

    Pennsylvania Writing“Virtue, Liberty and Independence” is the motto for the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, up next in our State Writing Resources series. One of the original thirteen colonies, Pennsylvania was the second state admitted to the Union, in 1787. Its capital is Harrisburg, and its two largest cities are Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, the latter of which is known–to all but Bostonians–as “the Cradle of Liberty.”

    Because of this long and important history, Pennsylvania writing has a similarly long and important history, and present. Benjamin Franklin, of course, did plenty of writing in Pennsylvania. Known to some as the United States’ first novelist, Charles Brockden Brown wrote, and set, most of his fiction in the Keystone State. (Edgar Huntly is a particular favorite of mine.) A quick roundup of famous writers born and/or raised in Pennsylvania offers an impressive list: Wallace Stevens, Louisa May Alcott, Marianne Moore. Updike, O’Hara, Michener. John D. MacDonald. Michael Chabon grep up in Pitt. Mat Johnson grew up in Philly. The great Pearl Buck spent many years in Pennsylvania. And on and on and on.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 12 Pennsylvania writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a keystone stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    15 Oregon Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Oct
    23

    OregonUp next in our State Writing Resources series, the Beaver State, Oregon. Capital Salem, largest city Portland. Hard to think about the state of Oregon without picturing Oregon Trail.

    Oregon writing boasts of eminences such as Richard Brautigan (Trouth Fishing in America); Vladimir Nabokov (he finished Lolita and began Pnin while living there); Sarah Winnemucca, known as the author of the first autobiography written by a Native American woman; legends Ken Kesey and Raymond Carver; and Gina Ochsner, who was born and went to college in Oregon, and who once won a writing contest I entered, which means, of course, that I will never forget her name.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 15 Oregon writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a beaver stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    10 Oklahoma Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments 4 comments
    Oct
    2

    OklahomaOklahoma, the Sooner State, is up next in our State Writing Resources series. Its motto is “Labor omnia vincit,” which means “Work conquers all,” which means “Get your ass out of bed, slacker!” Oklahoma achieved statehood on November 16, 1907, the same day that actor (and Rocky trainer) Burgess Meredith was born in … drum roll … you guessed it! Ohio. Ugh, so close.

    Oklahoma writing features a cast that includes such greats as Ralph Ellison (Invisible Man), Sarah Vowell (The Wordy Shipmates is my favorite of hers), Blake Edwards (the Pink Panther guy), National Book Award winner Joyce Carol Thomas, poet John Berryman, and, OK, Chuck Norris, who apparently can kill you in every way possible, and in many ways impossible.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 10 Oklahoma writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you’re an Okie or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    15 Ohio Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments 6 comments
    Sep
    18

    Ohio Welcomes YouSo as you may have noticed, we took the summer off from our State Writing Resources series. (Because, come on, who is looking for writing resources in the summertime?) But, now that autumn (egads!) is on its way and school is heading back into session, it’s time we … sent … our State Writing Resources series heading … back … into session.

    Ohio. An Iroquois word meaning “large river,” or thereabouts. We–or at least I–imagine Ohio as containing only two major cities, Cleveland and Cincy. But did you know that the state capital, Columbus, is bigger than the both of ’em? And that Toledo almost matches Cleveland in population? Ohio is known as the Buckeye State, a buckeye being both a brand of tree as well as a brand of 300-pound lineman who kicks the piss out of my favorite college football team every season.

    Ohio writing features a strong cast of characters, among them Sherwood Anderson, whose Winesburg, Ohio is–well, it’s a book I’ve never read, is what it is. Sorry. But another thing it is is (ugh) a short story cycle about a small Ohio town that reminded Anderson of his own. It’s supposed to be a stellar book. Also an Ohioan is Toni Morrison, whose Jazz, as many of you know, since I never shut up about it, is probably my favorite novel. Ambrose Bierce, who I believe is out there somewhere, alive, is from Ohio, and will someday return. Another great Ohioan: Erma Bombeck. And Donald Ray Pollock, whose Knockemstiff has been called a modern-day version of Winesburg, Ohio. And don’t forget James Thurber; we’ll touch on him in the list below.

    For now, presented in no particular order, here are 15 Ohio writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a buckeye or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    10 North Dakota Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Jun
    19

    North DakotaNorth Dakota, the “Peace Garden State”(?), the “Roughrider State”(?), the “Flickertail State”(?) is up next in our State Writing Resources series. Capital Bismarck, largest movie city Fargo, according to Wikipedia “North Dakota is considered the least visited state.” Awesome! Theodore Roosevelt State Park (ahh, that’s where the roughrider thing comes in) is the state’s most-visited tourist attraction. But you know, I’ve heard from numerous sources that North Dakota is a pretty state to drive through. I believe it.

    For a state with a population of not much over half a million, North Dakota writing boasts a pretty stellar lineup. Poet Thomas McGrath grew up there. Playwright Maxwell Anderson graduated high school in Jamestown–home of the world’s largest buffalo monument, which is called The World’s Largest Buffalo Monument. Pulitzer winner Louise Erdrich has some strong North Dakota ties. Chuck Klosterman grew up there and graduated from UND. William Gass! He was born in Fargo. Jennie Shortridge was born in Grand Forks. Western legend Louis L’Amour was born in Jamestown–home of the world’s largest buffa … well, etc.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 10 North Dakota writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a roughrider/peace gardener or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    15 North Carolina Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments 1 comment
    Jun
    3

    North CarolinaUp next in our State Writing Resources series is the good old Tar Heel State, North Carolina. The Province of North Carolina, which then included some of Tennessee, was one of the original thirteen colonies, and the twelfth admitted to the Union. North Carolina writing boasts such luminaries as Anne Tyler, Armistead Maupin and Thomas Wolfe. Maya Angelou spent much of her life in North Carolina. One of my favorites, Tom Robbins, was born a Tar Heel, as were Lionel Shriver and Jill McDonough.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 15 North Carolina writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a Tar Heel or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    15 New York Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    May
    15
    One of the famed Sidewalks of New York (photo credit: Duhr)

    One of the famed Sidewalks of New York (photo credit: Duhr)

    Up next in our State Writing Resources series is the Empire State, New York, the 11th state admitted to the Union (July 26, 1788). Didja know that the Albany area already had European settlers when the Pilgrims stepped onto (the probably imaginary) Plymouth Rock? So why do the Pilgrims get so much fking hype? New York State is 27th in area, 3rd in population (19,651,127 19,651,129), &c. &c., history lesson over.

    In past resource posts we’ve given a quick rundown of some of the featured state’s most renowned authors, but these two pages alone offer nearly 1,800 New York writers. Hell, you need to give Flavorwire 100 clicks just to reach the end of their list of the “most important” living writers in NYC.

    i.e., DIY.

    We thought of splitting this into two posts, State of New York writing resources and City of New York writing resources, but gee whiz, doesn’t New York City already get enough special treatment? And also, I don’t get paid extra for double duty. So yes, many of these are based in New York City. Some are not.

    (N.B. I looked up “gee whiz” to see if the standard spelling is “whiz” or “wiz,” and I found this gem: “comparative more gee whiz, superlative most gee whiz”)

    (I think “the most gee whiz” should be “the gee whizziest.” To whom do I speak about making this change?)

    Anywho, let’s get to the good stuff. Presented in no particular order, here are fifteen New York writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are an Empire Stater, or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at.

    (And don’t forget, WriteByNight is now a New York writing resource, technically, though as you know we work with writers worldwide. #1 in your hearts, #16 on this list. Maybe next year we’ll crack it.)

    read more

    New Mexico Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments 2 comments
    Mar
    27

    New Mexico flagNew Mexico, known as the Land of Enchantment, is next up in our State Writing Resources series. Yootó Hahoodzo in Navajo (speakers of which make up over 4% of the population), New Mexico is Nuevo Mexico in Spanish, although, in a little-known fact (which I just now learned), the territory/state was named New Mexico well before the nation south of it was named Mexico.

    When I think of New Mexico writing, Ed Abbey comes first to mind. Abbey attended UNM in Albuquerque, spent some time in Taos and (I believe) Santa Fe, and was perhaps literature’s fiercest defender of the American Southwest. Other writers with New Mexico ties include Rudolfo Anaya (Bless Me, Ultima), Cormac McCarthy, Denise Chavez, and Tony Hillerman, who wrote the Leaphorn and Chee Navajo crime series. George R. R. Martin, the Game of Thrones dude, makes his home in Albuquerque. And activist, novelist and poet Paula Gunn Allen spent most of her life in New Mexico, writing and teaching and stirring the pot.

    Presented in no particular order, here are twelve New Mexico writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a resident of this Land of Enchantment, or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    New Jersey Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments 2 comments
    Mar
    19
    Jersey, Duhr

    See that building over there? It’s in Jersey. (Photo credit: Duhr)

    The Garden State, good ol’ New Jersey, is next up in our State Writing Resources series. Capital Trenton, largest city Newark, motto “Liberty and prosperity,” Jersey gets a bad rap, but the handful of New Jerseyans I’ve known are fiercely loyal to their home state. We at WriteByNight can see Jersey out of our office window–it doesn’t look so bad, honest.

    The New Jersey writing scene has birthed or hosted some powerhouse authors: William Carlos Williams, who put Paterson, New Jersey (and red wheelbarri) on the map; the whole Higgins/Clark suspense novel dynasty; Judy Blume and Harriet Adams, beloved YA/children’s authors; the Newark-born Stephen Crane and Philip Roth; and WriteByNight friend Jeffrey Seglin. (For a much longer list, take a look here.)

    Presented in no particular order, here are sixteen New Jersey writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a Garden Stater, or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    New Hampshire Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Mar
    7

    New HampshireNext up in our State Writing Resources series is ye olde Granite State, New Hampshire, capital Concord, largest city Manchester, and the first American colony to break away from the British. Because “Live free or die!” (0:50 to 1:17 are SFW. The rest? Not so much.)

    The New Hampshire writing world has produced authors such as John Irving, Mary Baker Eddy and (gulp) Dan Brown. It is also where many writers seem to retire and pass away: Maxine Kumin, Thomas Williams, J.D. Salinger. Many more.

    Presented in no particular order, here are twelve New Hampshire writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a Granite Stater, or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more




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