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    10 Wyoming Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Sep
    25

    WyomingThis is the end, friends and readers and friend-readers — the final entry in our State Writing Resources, a series which began a full year-plus ago and has taken us through forty-nine states, one district, and, randomly, South Korea. Of course, our work is not done; these lists of resources are ever evolving, often based on input from you fine readers. If you know of an organization that would make a fine addition to any state list, simply drop us a line and let us know about it, or leave a comment on that particular state’s blog post.

    Wyoming. It’s one of our largest states, but has the smallest population. Even Cheyenne, the capital and biggest city, hosts only a little more than 60,000 people. Between the Rockies to the west, the High Plains to the east, and parks such as Yellowstone and Grand Teton, Wyoming is a gorgeous state. I’ve also been there during some hellish, super-sudden storms. The kind of storm you may come across in, say, an Annie Proulx story.

    A few prominent names in Wyoming writing include Proulx, whose most popular work, the short story “Brokeback Mountain,” originally appeared in a story collection titled Close Range: Wyoming Stories; Patricia Frolander, the state’s current poet laureate; Craig Johnson, whose Longmire series of books became a popular TV show; and George Clayton Johnson, best known for the novel Logan’s Run.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 10 Wyoming writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are an Equality Stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    15 Wisconsin Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Aug
    28

    WIThe penultimate state in our alphabetical series on State Writing Resources is my home state of Wisconsin. (Go ahead, get your Cheesehead jokes out of the way now.) Wisconsin — the Badger State, America’s Dairyland — in 1848 became the 30th state. Ninety years later, my dad was born in a tiny map-dot of a couple of thousand people called Richland Center. Seventy or so years after that, his son moved to New York City, the most populous area in the country, and he lives in a house where the only other person on his floor hails from … Richland Center, Wisconsin. There’s your small-world anecdote for the day.

    But we’re here to talk about writing! Some featured names in Wisconsin writing include: Ellen Raskin, author of The Westing Game, one of my favorite books as a child growing up in Raskin’s and my hometown of Milwaukee; Glenway Wescott, whose slim novel Pilgrim Hawk is an excellent read, and whose Apartment in Athens I think will be even better, if I ever get the chance to tackle it; Laura Ingalls Wilder, no introduction necessary; Thornton Wilder (Our Town); and Liberace! Born in West Allis, WI.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 15 Wisconsin writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are in America’s Dairyland or are planning a move there, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    10 West Virginia Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Aug
    7

    West VirginiaNext up in our State Writing Resources series is the Mountain State, good ol’ West Virginia, the 35th state admitted to the Union, ranked 38th in population and 41st in area. Trivia, yo! Did you know that West Virginia was the only state to separate from a Confederate state (Virginia, obvi) during the Civil War? This was after delegates from the region voted against Virginia’s secession from the Union. In a vote where apparently only 34% of them showed up at the polls, West Virginians were like, “Peace out, Virginia.” That’s a pretty wild and wonderful story. Fitting then that the state’s present motto–after retiring “Open for Business”(!) and “Almost Heaven” (thanks to John Denver)–is “Wild and Wonderful.”

    Some major players in West Virginia writing, past and present, include: Pearl Buck, who was born in West Virginia before being moved to China, out of which came her famous novel The Good Earth; Walter Dean Myers, whose YA novel Fallen Angels I must’ve read two dozen times as a kid; Scott McClanahan, whose Crapalachia is book we at WBN thoroughly enjoyed; John Knowles (A Separate Peace); Booker T. Washington, whose family, after emancipation, moved from Virginia to West Virginia, where Washington worked in coal mines to save up some money; and the distant Pancake cousins, Ann and Breece D’J, both of whom are known for writing fiction evocative of rural West Virginia.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 10 West Virginia writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a Mountain Stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    10 Washington DC Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Jul
    10

    Washington DCNext up in our State Writing Resources series is a city. A city within a district. But not exactly within, since, as I understand it, the city of Washington is exactly the size of the District of Columbia.

    Among the list of nicknames for Washington, DC, is “Nation’s Capital,” which is less a nickname than just a fact; “A Capital City,” again, fact; “The Capital of the World,” blech; and “The American Rome,” which is a bit dubious. Also, “City of Magnificent Distances.” What?! Apparently Dickens called it “City of Magnificent Intentions.” It’s also known as “Hollywood for Ugly People!” But don’t take offense. I didn’t, when I lived there.

    What I did do when I lived there was learn that there’s a vibrant Washington DC writing community. (A community that clearly didn’t teach me good syntax.) Presented in no particular order, here are 10 Washington DC writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a Federal City dweller or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    12 Washington Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Jun
    26

    Washington StateThe great state of Washington is next up in our State Writing Resources series. My goodness, we’re down to the final five states (or states and districts. Spoiler alert.) We’ve come a long way since Alabama, gang!

    Washington, known as the Evergreen State, was the forty-second state admitted to the Union, which happened in 1889, a full thirty years after Oregon, the Beaver State. Make your own jokes.

    Some heavy-hitters from the Washington writing world include the late, great Raymond Carver, the wildly popular Debbie Macomber, and Margaret Craven (I Heard the Owl Call My Name). Tom Robbins, who I got to mention in our Virginia post, lives, and has written most of his great books, in Washington.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 12 Washington writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are an Evergreen Stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    15 Virginia Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments 1 comment
    Jun
    5

    VirginiaThe next state up in our State Writing Resources series is … not a state. It’s a commonwealth, yo! Beautiful Virginia, known as Old Dominion, or the Mother of States(!). Yeah, the Mother of States is not a state. Figure that one out. I once took sort of a gap year in Virginia, worked at a bookstore in a tiny town called Shirlington, slipped over into D.C. as often as I could, which was hardly ever.

    Virginia writing boasts some heavy hitters with state ties, as you might expect, including such names as: Edgar Allan Poe, V.C. Andrews, Tom Wolfe, Adriana Trigiani, and Elizabeth Massie. My man Tom Robbins spent some years in Virginia, honing his hilarity. Rita Dove was the state’s commonwealth’s poet laureate in 1987. Ann Beattie grew up in nearby D.C. and teaches at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. And the list goes on and on. Don’t even get me started on Diane Mott Davidson.

    Point is, Virginia writing has a rich past, and perhaps an equally rich present. And the following organizations are a large part of that.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 15 Virginia writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are an Old Dominioner or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    12 Vermont Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    May
    15

    VermontGeographically it’s a long way from Utah to Vermont, but we here at WriteByNight roll alphabetically, yo! (Gosh, what a silly intro. I guess there are only so many interesting ways to introduce a State Writing Resources series post. It’s a good thing we’re at the Vs.)

    Didja know that Vermont wasn’t one of the original 13 colonies, contrary to what you may think without Wikipedia handy? Between 1777, when it declared its own independence from Great Britain, and 1791, when it joined the Union, Vermont was an independent republic called … Vermont Republic. Before then, New Hampshire, New York and England each wanted its grubby paws on Vermont’s resources.

    Does that include its writing resources, you may wonder? Well, take a peek at the list below and judge for yourself. But if we were New Hampshire, New York or England, we’d sure want to claim these as our own.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 12 Vermont writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a Green Mountain stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    10 Utah Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments 1 comment
    Apr
    16

    Utah writingWe’ve finally reached the homestretch of our State Writing Resources series; after getting over the Texas hump we’re now barreling west toward Utah. Ah, ‘tah. Its motto is “Industry.” A state of few words. A resident of Utah is known as a Beehive Stater, not because Utah is abuzz with hornets but because when one thinks of industry, one thinks of a beehive. And because some of the state’s founding Mormons initially called the place Deseret, which according to the Book of Mormon (according to Wikipedia) is “an ancient word for honeybee.”

    Utah writing boasts a Pulitzer and NBA winner, Wallace Stegner (aka “the Dean of Western Writers”), Ender’s Game author Orson Scott Card, Mormon poet Eliza Snow, and author of the Runelords series Dave Wolverton.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 10 Utah writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a Utahn/Utahan or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    21 Texas Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments 1 comment
    Mar
    20

    Texas writingNext up in our State Writing Resources series is the massive Lone Star State, Texas. As many of you likely know, WriteByNight, though born in Florida, grew up in Austin, and so we had the chance to work with and get to know many of the institutions, organizations and publications listed below. We continue to work with the wonderful O. Henry Museum in Austin through our In Short Fiction Workshop, and a little digging on our staff page will tell you that a handful of our fine writing coaches and consultants hang their ten-gallon hats in Texas. We sure do miss y’all. We even miss saying “y’all.”

    Presented in no particular order, here are 21 Texas writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a Lone Star Stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    12 Tennessee Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Mar
    5

    Tennessee writingToday our State Writing Resources series takes us to Tennessee. But first it takes us to Milwaukee, my hometown and birthplace of R&B artist Speech, co-founder of Arrested Development (the band), whose first major hit was “Tennessee,” a song I can’t help but think of nearly every time I hear the name of this fine state.

    Tennessee writing has an impressive history and present. Among the more famed writers who were born or grew up in Tennessee are Alex Haley, Ann Patchett, Cormac McCarthy, and Jo Carson. Dorothy Dix, at one time the U.S.’s most widely read female journalist, was born on the border of Tennessee and Kentucky. James Agee was a Knoxville boy, and Elizabeth Kostova is a Knoxville gal. And last but not least, Tennessee Williams was born and raised in … Mississippi.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 12 Tennessee writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a Volunteer Stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    10 South Dakota Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Feb
    12

    South Dakota writingToday our State Writing Resources series takes us to the great state of South Dakota, capital Pierre, largest city Sioux Falls, biggest tourist attraction Mount Rushmore (in fact, South Dakota’s official nickname is the Mount Rushmore State). South Dakota is the 17th largest state in area, but is 46th in population.

    South Dakota writing can boast of bigwigs such as: Laura Ingalls Wilder, whose time in South Dakota she fictionalized in Little Town on the Prairie; Adam Johnson, whose The Orphan Master’s Son was a smash hit in 2012; Vine Deloria Jr., famous for Custer Dies For Your Sins and, to me, memorable for writing the introduction to Black Elk Speaks; and screenwriter Bob Nelson, nominated for a Best Original Screenplay Oscar for South Dakota Nebraska.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 10 South Dakota writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a Mount Rushmore Stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    12 South Carolina Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments 1 comment
    Jan
    15

    South Carolina writingAs 2015 opens, our State Writing Resources series rolls on. And speaking of rolling–like, cigarettes and stuff–up next is South Carolina, the Palmetto State. Which, as I see now, is only sixth in the U.S. in tobacco production. North Carolina is first, and we’ve already covered it. I got my Carolinae confused! But it’s far, far too late to rewrite this lame intro now.

    South Carolina writing can brag of some heavy-hitting authors, including Dorothy Allison, Pat Conroy (The Prince of Tides), William Gibson, Valerie Sayers, and Norb Vonnegut (a fourth cousin of that other Vonnegut). Many of you are likely also familiar with the name Matthew J. Bruccoli, which, because he wrote an intro, is now on that omnipresent Great Gatsby cover.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 12 South Carolina writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a Palmetto Stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    10 Rhode Island Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Dec
    18
    The author in Rhode Island, a file which is named "Idiot in Providence."

    The author in Rhode Island, a file which is named “Idiot in Providence.”

    A simple “Hope” is the motto for Rhode Island, up next in our State Writing Resources series. One of the original thirteen colonies, Rhode Island is the smallest in area–in fact, its other nickname is “Little Rhody”–but it’s a tough little bugger. For example, did you know that Rhode Island was the first colony to declare independence from Great Britain? May 4, 1776. It’s also not an island, so don’t blame it if it’s sometimes confused.

    Rhode Island writing has a history–and a present–as strong as the state’s own. Jhumpa Lahiri grew up in Kingston, where her father worked as a librarian at URI. Ted Berrigan and H.P. Lovecraft were born in Providence. Forrest Gander, whose new novel The Trace I enjoyed, teaches at Brown. So does the great John Edgar Wideman, whose stellar short story “What We Cannot Speak About We Must Pass Over in Silence” we used to teach in workshops. Robert Coover is a professor emeritus at Brown. It’s quite a lineup there; may I please go back in time and study writing at Brown?

    Presented in no particular order, here are 10 Rhode Island writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are an ocean stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    12 Pennsylvania Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Dec
    4

    Pennsylvania Writing“Virtue, Liberty and Independence” is the motto for the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, up next in our State Writing Resources series. One of the original thirteen colonies, Pennsylvania was the second state admitted to the Union, in 1787. Its capital is Harrisburg, and its two largest cities are Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, the latter of which is known–to all but Bostonians–as “the Cradle of Liberty.”

    Because of this long and important history, Pennsylvania writing has a similarly long and important history, and present. Benjamin Franklin, of course, did plenty of writing in Pennsylvania. Known to some as the United States’ first novelist, Charles Brockden Brown wrote, and set, most of his fiction in the Keystone State. (Edgar Huntly is a particular favorite of mine.) A quick roundup of famous writers born and/or raised in Pennsylvania offers an impressive list: Wallace Stevens, Louisa May Alcott, Marianne Moore. Updike, O’Hara, Michener. John D. MacDonald. Michael Chabon grep up in Pitt. Mat Johnson grew up in Philly. The great Pearl Buck spent many years in Pennsylvania. And on and on and on.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 12 Pennsylvania writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a keystone stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    15 Oregon Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Oct
    23

    OregonUp next in our State Writing Resources series, the Beaver State, Oregon. Capital Salem, largest city Portland. Hard to think about the state of Oregon without picturing Oregon Trail.

    Oregon writing boasts of eminences such as Richard Brautigan (Trouth Fishing in America); Vladimir Nabokov (he finished Lolita and began Pnin while living there); Sarah Winnemucca, known as the author of the first autobiography written by a Native American woman; legends Ken Kesey and Raymond Carver; and Gina Ochsner, who was born and went to college in Oregon, and who once won a writing contest I entered, which means, of course, that I will never forget her name.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 15 Oregon writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a beaver stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    10 Oklahoma Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments 4 comments
    Oct
    2

    OklahomaOklahoma, the Sooner State, is up next in our State Writing Resources series. Its motto is “Labor omnia vincit,” which means “Work conquers all,” which means “Get your ass out of bed, slacker!” Oklahoma achieved statehood on November 16, 1907, the same day that actor (and Rocky trainer) Burgess Meredith was born in … drum roll … you guessed it! Ohio. Ugh, so close.

    Oklahoma writing features a cast that includes such greats as Ralph Ellison (Invisible Man), Sarah Vowell (The Wordy Shipmates is my favorite of hers), Blake Edwards (the Pink Panther guy), National Book Award winner Joyce Carol Thomas, poet John Berryman, and, OK, Chuck Norris, who apparently can kill you in every way possible, and in many ways impossible.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 10 Oklahoma writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you’re an Okie or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    15 Ohio Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments 6 comments
    Sep
    18

    Ohio Welcomes YouSo as you may have noticed, we took the summer off from our State Writing Resources series. (Because, come on, who is looking for writing resources in the summertime?) But, now that autumn (egads!) is on its way and school is heading back into session, it’s time we … sent … our State Writing Resources series heading … back … into session.

    Ohio. An Iroquois word meaning “large river,” or thereabouts. We–or at least I–imagine Ohio as containing only two major cities, Cleveland and Cincy. But did you know that the state capital, Columbus, is bigger than the both of ’em? And that Toledo almost matches Cleveland in population? Ohio is known as the Buckeye State, a buckeye being both a brand of tree as well as a brand of 300-pound lineman who kicks the piss out of my favorite college football team every season.

    Ohio writing features a strong cast of characters, among them Sherwood Anderson, whose Winesburg, Ohio is–well, it’s a book I’ve never read, is what it is. Sorry. But another thing it is is (ugh) a short story cycle about a small Ohio town that reminded Anderson of his own. It’s supposed to be a stellar book. Also an Ohioan is Toni Morrison, whose Jazz, as many of you know, since I never shut up about it, is probably my favorite novel. Ambrose Bierce, who I believe is out there somewhere, alive, is from Ohio, and will someday return. Another great Ohioan: Erma Bombeck. And Donald Ray Pollock, whose Knockemstiff has been called a modern-day version of Winesburg, Ohio. And don’t forget James Thurber; we’ll touch on him in the list below.

    For now, presented in no particular order, here are 15 Ohio writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a buckeye or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    10 North Dakota Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Jun
    19

    North DakotaNorth Dakota, the “Peace Garden State”(?), the “Roughrider State”(?), the “Flickertail State”(?) is up next in our State Writing Resources series. Capital Bismarck, largest movie city Fargo, according to Wikipedia “North Dakota is considered the least visited state.” Awesome! Theodore Roosevelt State Park (ahh, that’s where the roughrider thing comes in) is the state’s most-visited tourist attraction. But you know, I’ve heard from numerous sources that North Dakota is a pretty state to drive through. I believe it.

    For a state with a population of not much over half a million, North Dakota writing boasts a pretty stellar lineup. Poet Thomas McGrath grew up there. Playwright Maxwell Anderson graduated high school in Jamestown–home of the world’s largest buffalo monument, which is called The World’s Largest Buffalo Monument. Pulitzer winner Louise Erdrich has some strong North Dakota ties. Chuck Klosterman grew up there and graduated from UND. William Gass! He was born in Fargo. Jennie Shortridge was born in Grand Forks. Western legend Louis L’Amour was born in Jamestown–home of the world’s largest buffa … well, etc.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 10 North Dakota writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a roughrider/peace gardener or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    15 North Carolina Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments 1 comment
    Jun
    3

    North CarolinaUp next in our State Writing Resources series is the good old Tar Heel State, North Carolina. The Province of North Carolina, which then included some of Tennessee, was one of the original thirteen colonies, and the twelfth admitted to the Union. North Carolina writing boasts such luminaries as Anne Tyler, Armistead Maupin and Thomas Wolfe. Maya Angelou spent much of her life in North Carolina. One of my favorites, Tom Robbins, was born a Tar Heel, as were Lionel Shriver and Jill McDonough.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 15 North Carolina writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a Tar Heel or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    15 New York Writing Resources

    Posted Posted by David Duhr in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    May
    15
    One of the famed Sidewalks of New York (photo credit: Duhr)

    One of the famed Sidewalks of New York (photo credit: Duhr)

    Up next in our State Writing Resources series is the Empire State, New York, the 11th state admitted to the Union (July 26, 1788). Didja know that the Albany area already had European settlers when the Pilgrims stepped onto (the probably imaginary) Plymouth Rock? So why do the Pilgrims get so much fking hype? New York State is 27th in area, 3rd in population (19,651,127 19,651,129), &c. &c., history lesson over.

    In past resource posts we’ve given a quick rundown of some of the featured state’s most renowned authors, but these two pages alone offer nearly 1,800 New York writers. Hell, you need to give Flavorwire 100 clicks just to reach the end of their list of the “most important” living writers in NYC.

    i.e., DIY.

    We thought of splitting this into two posts, State of New York writing resources and City of New York writing resources, but gee whiz, doesn’t New York City already get enough special treatment? And also, I don’t get paid extra for double duty. So yes, many of these are based in New York City. Some are not.

    (N.B. I looked up “gee whiz” to see if the standard spelling is “whiz” or “wiz,” and I found this gem: “comparative more gee whiz, superlative most gee whiz”)

    (I think “the most gee whiz” should be “the gee whizziest.” To whom do I speak about making this change?)

    Anywho, let’s get to the good stuff. Presented in no particular order, here are fifteen New York writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are an Empire Stater, or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at.

    (And don’t forget, WriteByNight is now a New York writing resource, technically, though as you know we work with writers worldwide. #1 in your hearts, #16 on this list. Maybe next year we’ll crack it.)

    read more




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