• Stop Starting and Start Finishing Your Writing

    By on July 30, 2015 Posted in Strategies     Comments 4 comments
    Jul
    30

    Success Starts HereHello, my name is Justine, and I’m a starter.

    I start far more writing projects than I finish.

    I have new ideas every day, demanding ideas that demand to be started.

    I love the feeling of starting. I love it so much that I’ll take starting over continuing or (gulp) finishing any day of the week.

    Yup, I’m a starter, and I’m not alone. I recently received the following email from writer Melissa M.: read more

    Staff Spotlight: Andy Wolfendon

    By on July 24, 2015 Posted in WBN News & Events     Comments No comments
    Jul
    24

    Andy Wolfendon, consultant and coachToday we’d like to introduce the newest member of WriteByNight’s staff of consultants and coaches, Andy Wolfendon. Andy is a prolific ghostwriter, playwright, stand-up comic and lyricist, and has years of experience teaching writing at the college level.

    Below is a Q&A with Andy Wolfendon, followed by a brief bio.

     

     

     

    Where are you from?

    The Singularity, by way of Lawrence, Massachusetts.

     

    Where did you study?

    Got my Master’s at Emerson College, where I learned that the people who had the most game weren’t necessarily the best writers.

     

    How did you get your start as a writer?

    Writing and storytelling have always been survival tools. I faked my way through college by writing killer essays, and saved my a** more than a few times by telling a good story. I got into professional writing by way of comedy. I was an actor and stand-up comic, but finally realized I liked writing the material better than I liked performing it. That led to several years of writing scripts for the computer/video game industry and spec screenplays, and then finally back to my first love: books. read more

    Writers at Work at Work: Ivan Glonstein

    By on July 17, 2015 Posted in Writing at Work     Comments 2 comments
    Jul
    17

    The StacksLibraries are popular writing havens for many of us. In theory, at least, they’re quiet and they’re calm, and no matter where you sit down, whether it’s at an open table or squatting in some forgotten stacks, you’re surrounded by books and, more importantly for some of us, the smell of books.

    But is a library a good writing environment if it’s also your workplace?

    In our latest “Writers at Work at Work,” “Ivan Glonstein” tells us that it is–with a few caveats. Including guilt and shame.

    This series sprang from a conversation I had with a friend who told me that he works on his novel when his boss isn’t buzzing around. I asked for some brave volunteers to share their experiences with us of writing at work; so far we’ve heard from RaymundoJake, and Dana. Today we’re talking to:

     

    “Ivan Glonstein”

     

    Do you want us to use a pseudonym for you?

    This first question already stumped me. In a sense, I want to say fuck no, I don’t care. I don’t care. But, everything has changed in the last half a year. I’m the sole breadwinner for a family of three, my wife and my daughter. Before, I could say, “Writing is so important to me that I’m willing to risk my job.” But now I suppose I shouldn’t be [redacted]. I should be “Ivan Glonstein.” read more

    10 Washington DC Writing Resources

    By on July 10, 2015 Posted in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Jul
    10

    Washington DCNext up in our State Writing Resources series is a city. A city within a district. But not exactly within, since, as I understand it, the city of Washington is exactly the size of the District of Columbia.

    Among the list of nicknames for Washington, DC, is “Nation’s Capital,” which is less a nickname than just a fact; “A Capital City,” again, fact; “The Capital of the World,” blech; and “The American Rome,” which is a bit dubious. Also, “City of Magnificent Distances.” What?! Apparently Dickens called it “City of Magnificent Intentions.” It’s also known as “Hollywood for Ugly People!” But don’t take offense. I didn’t, when I lived there.

    What I did do when I lived there was learn that there’s a vibrant Washington DC writing community. (A community that clearly didn’t teach me good syntax.) Presented in no particular order, here are 10 Washington DC writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are a Federal City dweller or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    Writers at Work at Work: Dana

    By on July 3, 2015 Posted in Writing at Work     Comments 4 comments
    Jul
    3

    Workplace frustrationHappy July 3rd, WriteByNighters! We hope most of you are blessed with the day off and can get your Fourth of July celebrations started the right way.

    Speaking of days off, our latest Writer at Work at Work, Dana, never again has to go work at her electric co-op, which we imagine is a big relief, seeing as how her office was “a mash-up of kindergarten and federal custody.”

    Once again, this series sprang from a conversation I had with a friend who told me that he works on his novel when his boss isn’t buzzing around. I asked for some brave volunteers to share their experiences with us of writing at work, and the responses have been flooding in. Though we’re still taking more! If you’re interested in sharing with us, drop me a line and I’ll get you started. So far we’ve heard from Raymundo and Jake; today we’ll hear from:

    Dana

    Please describe your work setting: do you have privacy in which to write, or are you out in the open? An inspiring view of nature, or cubicle walls? Computer or longhand?

    My writing at work happened several years ago when I was working for an electric cooperative. I had a dull cubicle that I didn’t personalize or decorate because I was not allowed to. read more

    12 Washington Writing Resources

    By on June 26, 2015 Posted in Writing Resources     Comments No comments
    Jun
    26

    Washington StateThe great state of Washington is next up in our State Writing Resources series. My goodness, we’re down to the final five states (or states and districts. Spoiler alert.) We’ve come a long way since Alabama, gang!

    Washington, known as the Evergreen State, was the forty-second state admitted to the Union, which happened in 1889, a full thirty years after Oregon, the Beaver State. Make your own jokes.

    Some heavy-hitters from the Washington writing world include the late, great Raymond Carver, the wildly popular Debbie Macomber, and Margaret Craven (I Heard the Owl Call My Name). Tom Robbins, who I got to mention in our Virginia post, lives, and has written most of his great books, in Washington.

    Presented in no particular order, here are 12 Washington writing resources, from conferences to local critique groups to literary magazines. If you are an Evergreen Stater or are planning to become one, these are some organizations you might want to take a peek at. read more

    Staff Spotlight: Bill Hammond

    By on June 18, 2015 Posted in WBN News & Events     Comments No comments
    Jun
    18

    Today we’d like to introduce you to Bill Hammond, a new member of WriteByNight’s staff of wonderful consultants and coaches. Bill is a forty-year veteran of the publishing industry, and the author of, among other titles, a six-book series of nautical/historical fiction.

    Below is a Q&A with Bill Hammond, followed by a brief bio.

     

    Where are you from?

    I was born in Boston and grew up on Boston’s North Shore, in Manchester. read more


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